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chronic plantar fasciitis in left foot

lisagarden
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07/17/2020 - 9:38pm
chronic plantar fasciitis in left foot

I have had chronic low-grade plantar fasciosis in my left foot for over 10 years. I have attached pictures where you can see the relative lack of muscle development in my left foot as compared to my right foot. My right foot is broader and more toned. You can see that the arch on my left foot is flatter and that some of my left toes are limp.

I beleive that minimalist shoes are the way to go, although my left foot is still too dysfunctional for that to be a good choice at all times. But I defintiley will not wear shoes with a narrow toe box or a heel rise. I recently discovered the Gokhale method and I think that it might be what will finally help rid me of my plantar fasciitis. I feel my left foot contacting the ground in a more functional way as I practice my beginner's (by no means perfect) version of glidewalking.

My question is, is there some element of the Gokhale method that I should be specifically focusing on to get my foot in better shape? I know there is an advanced technique to be used during glidewalking that involves using the feet a certain way (gripping the ground or something?), but I don't know much about it. I know there are many exercises listed in the book, but I am looking for that "every step is a rep" approach more so than isolated exercises. I would also love to hear any other testimonials of success or any other tips. Thanks!

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The Method attends to the feet in most of the routines. When we sit, we adopt and hold a kidney bean shape. That holding begins retraining the muscles of the feet. In standing, we add placing the weight on the heels to the kidney bean shaping. Those elements aid the process of relieving stress on the plantar fascia. 

 For foot strength, and specifically for your imbalance, use the inchworm exercise from the back of the book. That will train a squeeze that, in walking, grips the ground through the stride, after the foot lands. That squeeze works to fully activate the glute to propel you forward. "Every step is a rep" refers to that action. Focusing on that activation by keeping the heel down until the next foot lands will be a key element in your Glidewalking. 

Glad to hear after ten years you are finding some relief. If you would like further information, please ask. Good luck in your practice.

Harrison

GMF Teacher

 

 

lisagarden
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Thank you for your thoughtful response! It's hard to understand how to grip the ground through the stride. Should I actively be inchworming my foot in some way as I walk? 

I knew I needed to keep my back heel down for longer but I didn't realize that I should try to keep it down until my front foot had landed. I will definitely try that out. 

Thank you again Harrison!

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I hope your practice continues to improve. The foot is relaxed until contact with the ground, then squeezed. Instinct would trigger the squeeze once the foot feels an object. Shoes allow us to lose touch with this instinct, but we can overcome that loss with attention and practice. With time pain lessens as the foot rebuilds strength and lost habits reform.

Be well, and good luck!

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